Genre:

The Anatomy of Public Corruption

SEC Rules









Reporting Requirements
The required disclosures and forms of disclosure vary depending on the situation and the registrant. In general, under Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act (codified in 15 U.S.C. § 78m), companies with registered publicly held securities and companies of a certain size are called "reporting companies," meaning that they must make periodic disclosures by filing annual reports (called a Form 10-K) and quarterly reports (called a Form 10-Q). Reporting companies must also promptly disclose certain important events (called a Form 8-K). These periodic reports include or incorporate by reference types of information that would help investors decide whether a company's security is a good investment. Information in these reports includes information about the company's officers and directors, the company's line of business, audited financial statements, and the management discussion and analysis section.

The Exchange Act also mandates disclosure at certain crucial points so that investors can make an informed decision before purchasing stock. Sections 14(a)-(c) (codified in 15 U.S.C. § 78n(a)-(c)) govern disclosure during proxy contests, when various parties might solicit an investor's vote on a corporate action or to vote for certain board members. All disclosure materials must be filed with the SEC.













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